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lesson bookUNIT 1 — Lesson 1A
Parts of the Introduction

 
 

The introduction is the beginning of an essay. It does the same job for an essay as the topic sentence does for a paragraph. In a paragraph, the topic sentence tells the reader what the subject of the paragraph will be and how it will be developed. In an essay, the introduction, which can be one or two paragraphs, introduces the topic.

There are three parts to an introduction: the opening statement, the supporting sentences, and the introductory topic sentence. There are many ways to write an introduction, but it is necessary to include each of the three parts:

  • an opening statement or question that attracts the reader's attention — this is often called "the hook",
  • supporting sentences which link "the hook" to the thesis, and
  • a thesis statement that states the purpose and plan of the whole essay.

In the example introductory paragraphs below, the opening statement, supporting statements, or thesis statement is highlighted.


Opening Statement

Hugh Lofting's character, Dr. Doolittle, could talk to animals and they could talk back. Many people fantasize about having such a skill. Imagine being able to talk to your household pets and getting a response back. Could it ever be possible? Language acquisition studies among primates such as gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobo chimpanzees suggest that the answer is yes, and no.


Supporting Statements

Hugh Lofting's character, Dr. Doolittle, could talk to animals and they could talk back. Many people fantasize about having such a skill. Imagine being able to talk to your household pets and getting a response back. Could it ever be possible? Language acquisition studies among primates such as gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobo chimpanzees suggest that the answer is yes, and no.


Thesis Statement

Hugh Lofting's character, Dr. Doolittle, could talk to animals and they could talk back. Many people fantasize about having such a skill. Imagine being able to talk to your household pets and getting a response back. Could it ever be possible? Language acquisition studies among primates such as gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobo chimpanzees suggest that the answer is yes, and no.