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GRAMMAR & STRUCTURE
Compound Sentences

 
 

A compound sentence consists of two or more simple sentences put together in one sentence.

The

students walked

to the beach, and

they went

for a swim.

 

subject + verb

 

subject + verb

 

A compound sentence joins two or more simple sentences (also called independent clauses) in one sentence by either:

  1. Using a linking word or coordinate conjunction (with a comma) to join the independent clauses together. Linking words are words such as: and, but, or, so
    OR

  2. Using a semicolon (;) with a transition to join the independent clauses together. Transitions are special kinds of linking words such as: therefore, however
    OR

  3. Using a semicolon (;) without a transition to join the independent clauses together.

A compound sentence:

  • has more than one subject + verb.

  • has tense agreement between the verbs.

  • can show time differences by using different verb tenses.

  • can omit the second subject if the subjects are the same.

Related sections
Independent and Dependent Clauses
Linking Words
Punctuation
Sentence Combining: Part A
Simple Sentences