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University of VictoriaIntroduction to IT English
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List of Common Adverbs

Adverbs of Time

When?

after

I’ll e-mail you after work.

already

I already visited that Web site.

during

I sent Brad a text message during the meeting.

finally

I’ve been waiting for my broadband connection for six weeks, but I finally was able to connect to the Internet.

just

They just got connected to the Internet! Now they are ready to explore many Web sites.

last

Last night I received your e-mail.

later

Why don’t we have a meeting later? I can’t meet now.

next

I’m going to buy a new digital camera next week.

now

Why don’t you call me later on my cellphone? I can’t talk now.

recently

Judy recently won a big prize for her latest Web design project.

soon

Soon, I’ll be working on my new Web site and will be able to promote the company.

then

Soon, I’ll have the new Web site online then we can promote the company.

tomorrow

Tomorrow is the first day of the course.

when

Call me when you finish your homework.

while

While you were at the library, your teacher called.

yesterday Did you see the new software release notification on the Internet yesterday?

How long? (Duration)

for

The project manager told Isaac to attend an online training session for three hours.

forever

Isaac wants to live and work in Canada forever.

from ___ to ____

Mariko is going to be in Tokyo from April 1 to April 10.

since

Isaac has been afraid of virus attacks since last year, when his computer failed because he opened an infected attachment.

still

Mariko is still working on the project. She will finish it next week.

until We can work on this project until the project deadline next week.

How often? (Frequency)

always

I always read the online news at ten o’clock.

often

I visit Lila’s Web page often.

as often as (possible)

I create my backup copies as often as I can. This week I backed up my work every day.

every

I have a meeting in my colleague’s office every Thursday.

once a

I have a status meeting with my co-workers once a week.

regularly

I check my e-mail regularly.

usually

When I visit your Web page, I usually notice the updates.

sometimes

Sometimes , I forget to save my files.

from time to time

I download information from the Internet from time to time.

seldom

I seldom send regular mail. I can’t remember the last time I sent a letter.

rarely

I rarely print my files. I read all of my files on the computer.

never I will never forget to create backup files.

Adverbs of Manner

How is something done?

Adjective + -ly

cheerfully

The employee cheerfully greeted her co-worker in the morning.

automatically

The building doors open automatically; you don’t have to touch the door at all.

professionally

This report is professionally written.

beautifully

The presentation went beautifully.

happily

Gabriel and Jill happily presented their new Web site.

quickly

If you review your notes quickly, you will be better prepared for the presentation.

seriously

Are you seriously considering switching to a different Internet provider?

slowly

The large document loaded slowly.

Other common adverbs

fast

The new scanner processes the files fast.

hard

He works hard to meet the deadline next week.

well George is doing well at his new job.

Adverbs of Certainty

How certain is the speaker?

surely

Surely he knows his password!

certainly

I certainly know my login!

probably

The meeting will probably start on time.

obviously

The meeting has started. It’s obviously going to be a productive session.

clearly

You excelled on the test. Clearly, you have been studying hard.

perhaps

My computer isn’t working. Perhaps there is something wrong with the hard drive.

maybe My computer is not working well. Maybe I should get it looked at by a technician.

Adverbs of Completeness

How much?

absolutely

I’m absolutely convinced that we will meet the deadline.

almost

I’m almost finished creating the presentation.

completely

I am completely finished designing the database. Can I input the data now?

enough / not enough

Have you researched the topic enough, or do you need some more time?

entirely

I entirely agree with you. You are 100 percent right.

fully

Are you fully aware of all the components of this project?

hardly

I have hardly spent enough time on the project to understand it completely.

partly

Her answer is partly correct, but she is missing some important details.

rather

I rather like this laptop. It’s very portable.

really

I really like your new webcam.

too

This monitor is too small. I can’t see the entire image.

too much / too little

I have spent too much time waiting for the software to download.

totally

I totally agree with you. Everything you say is accurate.

very / not very I’m very pleased with the performance of my new hard drive.

Adverbs of Place

Where?

everywhere

Banner ads are everywhere on the Internet.

here

Bring the laptop here, so I can fix it.

there The file was there this morning. Do you know who deleted it?